Facts About Oral Cancer

April is Oral Cancer Awareness month. Mouth cancer can often be spotted in its early stages by your dentist during a thorough mouth examination. If mouth cancer is recognized early, the chances of a cure are favorable. It is important to visit your dentist regularly, as often as they recommend, even if you wear dentures. Read More …

National Nutrition Month

Cheese, milk, plain yogurt, calcium-fortified tofu, leafy greens and almonds, are foods that may benefit tooth health thanks to their high amounts of calcium and other nutrients they provide. Protein-rich foods like meat, poultry, fish, milk and eggs are the best sources of phosphorus. Both of these minerals play a critical role in dental health, Read More …

Gum Disease Affects More Than Just Your Smile

Did you know that 7 of the 10 leading causes of death reported by the CDC can be connected to inflammation and/or bacteria in the mouth? Evidence supports a cause and effect relationship between periodontal disease and arterial disease. This correlation between oral health and systemic conditions is now broadly accepted by both the medical Read More …

Oral Cancer

Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (cancer of the mouth and upper throat) collectively kill nearly one person every hour of every day of the year. Of the people newly diagnosed with these cancers, 40 percent will not survive longer than five years. Moreover, many who do survive suffer long-term problems, such as severe facial disfigurement or Read More …

the Great American Smoke Out!

Smoking is one of the worst habits for a person’s health. According to the American Cancer Society, “36.5 million Americans still smoke cigarettes, and tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the world.”  This Great American Smokeout, we encourage our patients, family members and friends to make a Read More …

Oral Care Affects Heart Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the US, taking more than 1 million lives every year. According to a 2016 study, gum disease increases your risk for a heart attack by 28%. Researchers believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the connection. Regular healthy Read More …